Noticeboard

Coronavirus information - contact 111 - please do not attend the practice.

Dr Carolyn Cottrell is now on maternity leave and her patients are looked after by Dr Thomas Russell.

Find out how to access our extended hours appointments

Flu and other vaccinations

Flu Clinics 2020-21

We have limited flu stock until we are able to access the government's centrally procured vaccine, so we will invite our patients in order of clinical need, as defined by NHS England. 

Please make sure the mobile number we have for you is up to date so that we can send you personalised information about how you can book into one of our flu clinics.  Clinics will be bookable online this year, so please download the NHS App so that you are ready book.  You will also be able to order prescriptions, view your medical record and check results.

You can check NHS Choices for general information about flu eligibility: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccinations/who-should-have-flu-vaccine/

Please note that, if you are aged between 50 and 64 and not in a clinical at risk group, the earliest you will be offered a flu vaccination is November, providing there is sufficient vaccine. No appointments will be offered for people in this age group until then. This is to ensure that those who are most at risk are vaccinated first.  If you are aged 50 to 64 and are in a clinical ‘at risk’ group which is eligible for the flu vaccination, for example you have a health condition which puts you at risk from the flu, you will be invited earlier.

Flu - why am I asked to wait? Patient leaflet

Check this web page for up to date information on clinics when it is available.

Children's Immunisation Schedule

We are continuing our essential child immunisation programme during the Covid-19 pandemic.  See this document for more information: 

NHS Immunisations FAQs

Here's a checklist of the vaccines that are routinely offered to everyone in the UK for free on the NHS, and the age at which you should ideally have them.

2 months:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib, a bacterial infection that can cause severe pneumonia or meningitis in young children) given as a 5-in-1 single jab known as DTaP/IPV/Hib
  • Pneumococcal infection

immunisation3 months:

  • 5-in-1, second dose (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Meningitis C

4 months:

  • 5-in-1, third dose (DTaP/IPV/Hib)
  • Pneumococcal infection, second dose
  • Meningitis C, second dose

Between 12 and 13 months:

  • Meningitis C, third dose
  • Hib, fourth dose (Hib/MenC given as a single jab)
  • MMR (measles, mumps and rubella), given as a single jab
  • Pneumococcal infection, third dose

3 years and 4 months, or soon after:

  • MMR second jab
  • Diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and polio (DtaP/IPV), given as a 4-in-1 pre-school booster

Around 12-13 years:

  • Cervical cancer (HPV) vaccine, which protects against cervical cancer (girls only): three jabs given within six months

Around 13-18 years:

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and polio booster (Td/IPV), given as a single jab

65 and over:

  • Flu (every year)
  • Pneumococcal

New - Children's flu vaccinations - click here for more information


HPA Childrens Vaccination Schedule

Click here for the recommended HPA vaccination schedule


These links all come from trusted resources but if you are unsure about these or any other medical matters please contact your doctor or pharmacist for advice

 



 
Call 111 when you need medical help fast but it’s not a 999 emergencyNHS ChoicesThis site is brought to you by My Surgery Website